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Red Moon: True Prophesy or Superstition?

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    cameo-d posted Thu, 16 Oct 2008 22:44:00 GMT(10/16/2008)

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    Joined 7/30/2008

    There are several scriptures that say the moon will turn blood red and the sun will be darkened before Armageddon takes place.

    I have seen many red moons. They were astoundingly beautiful, but the nag of superstitious words can prevent one from enjoying the beauty of this phenomenon.

    We know today that the "red moon" is caused by dust particles in the atmosphere. These particles can also cause a "blue moon",too.

    In the past, red moons have been caused by lunar eclipse as well as volcanic ash in the atmosphere.

    In the "Ancient days" I suppose certain civilizations saw this phenomenon as a "bad omen" because they had no explanation for it. I think there were some societies that offered human sacrifices at a red moon to appease the gods and to avert an imagined disaster.

    What do you think when you read these scriptures concerning the red moon prophesy of Armageddon? Do you write it off as superstition, or does it give you the creeps, or do you really look for something "bad" to happen to cause this red moon?

    Acts 2:20The sun will be turned to darkness and the moon to blood before the coming of the great and glorious day of the Lord.

    Rev 6:12 I watched as he opened the sixth seal. There was a great earthquake. The sun turned black like sackcloth made of goat hair, the whole moon turned blood red,

    Joel 2:31The sun will be turned to darkness and the moon to blood before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the LORD.

    F yknot posted Thu, 16 Oct 2008 23:13:00 GMT(10/16/2008)

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    Joined 8/24/2007

    Never heard of any superstitition.......

    I guess I tend to look at scientifically......as the moon is low on the horizon and as you mentioned is cause by light filtered through earth's atmosphere......usually dust.........much like the sun rising appearance in the morning.

    A literal interpretation of the scriptures would be lunar eclipse but the question then becomes whether it is a scheduled one or brought about by God and as a unnatural phenomenon.

    Time will telll......

    {{{halcyon}}} posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 00:03:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 7/19/2008

    I've always thought that if the ancients saw a "red moon", it probably signalled some (unknown to them) natural disaster nearby, possibly one that spelled imminent danger to them, like a fire or a volcano or dust storm or other bad storm.


    Still doesn't stop the occasional dream about it, though ....

    I dunno. I suppose if someday I see a dark sun, and then a red moon, and then the Lord's day comes, well, then I'll know. Until then, I don't.

    Satanus posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 01:05:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 8/31/2001

    Those scriptures are the ravings of foam spitting delusionaries, or entertainers. The lord has left the galaxie, maybe even the universe.

    I enjoy nature: lightening, full moons on clear nights, red/golden moons as they rise, sunsets/rises. It's all in how you see things. Of course, if you live in a tsunami, earth quake prone area, or have forest fires threatening, it's a different story.

    S

    cameo-d posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:24:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 7/30/2008

    still looking for answers.

    Does red moon have anything to do with human sacrifice? Could it indicate war, or holocaust?

    Is it really prohpecy or superstition?

    mustang posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:32:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 3/29/2001

    It's vague, but I remember talk of the nations arguing over the moon and going to war. I think that this was even said from the platform. In the older days when I was going to meetings, there was latitude on what could be said in "talks". Some brothers added their own twists ("embellishments"). If not from the platform, I recall this being discussed and maybe in used in FS.

    Around the time of the moon landings, this was particularly bandied about.

    Mustang

    M funkyderek posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 18:35:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 7/3/2001

    cameo-d:

    Is it really prohpecy or superstition?

    It's both. It's something somebody didn't understand so they made up an explanation and is therefore superstition. It also purports to predict the future, so it's prophecy. Of course it's not true prophecy, there's no such thing.

    Leolaia posted Fri, 17 Oct 2008 22:24:00 GMT(10/17/2008)

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    Joined 9/1/2002

    Of course it is rooted in superstitition; the motif of darkenings or eclipses of the sun and moon are frequently mentioned as evil omens in the Greco-Roman literature of the time (e.g. Cicero, De Republica 1.16.25; Vergil, Georgica 1.463-68; Dionysius Halicarnassus, Antiquitates Romanae 1.77.2; Ovid, Metamorphoses 15.785; Plutarch, Pelopidas 31; Cassius Dio, Historia Romana 47.40.2, etc.). Artemidorus, for example, says that a sun "dim or suffused with blood, or hideous to behold, is inauspicious and evil for all men" (Oneirocritica 2.36). These motifs are mainstays of ancient apocalyptic thought, as signs of the cosmic upheaval that accompany the end of the present world (e.g. Testament of Moses 10:5, Testament of Levi 4:1, Sibylline Oracles 5.477-82, Pseudo-Philo 19:13, 4 Ezra 7:39, etc.). The Zoroastrian/Jewish apocalypse of the Oracles of Hystaspes (which I believe was a literary source for Revelation), for instance, says that "strange prodigies in the sky will confound the minds of men with the greatest terror: the tails of comets, eclipses of the sun, the color of the moon, and the fallings of stars" (apud Lactantius, Divinarum Institutionum 7.16.8). The NT references to this motif are all literarily dependent on Joel 3:4 and similar motifs occur in Isaiah 13:10, 24:33, Amos 8:9, Zephaniah 1:15, and other references to cosmic upheaval can be found in Isaiah 34:4 and similar passages. The OT motif, in turn, is probably dependent on older Egyptian, Hittite, Hurrian, Akkadian, and Canaanite mythology pertaining to the divine cause of disaster and/or Chaoskampf in divine theophany (e.g. the twentieth-century BC Prophecy of Neferti, I.25-29, II.51-54 on the darkening of the sun during a time of disaster). The Chaoskampf theme (which is widely distributed in folklore, and eclipses are commonly thought to result from the acitivity of dragons) is still very much overt in Ezekiel 32:

    "You are like a lion among the nations, you are like a dragon in the seas, you burst forth in your rivers, you stire up the waters with your feet, and foul their rivers. Thus says Yahweh: I will throw my net over you, I will haul you up in my dragnet. I will cast you on the ground, on the open field I will fling you. I will cause all the birds of the air to settle on you, I will gorge the beasts of the whole earth with you. I will strew your flesh upon the mountains, I will fill the valleys with your carcass. I will drench the land with your flowing blood, the watercourses will be full of you. When I blot you out, I will cover the heavens, I will make the stars dark. I will cover the sun with a cloud, the moon shall not give its light. All the bright lights of heaven I will blacken over you, I will put darkness upon your land" (Ezekiel 32:2-8).

    Here the darkening of the sun is due to the dark cloud that Yahweh covers the land with. Compare with an interesting Akkadian text from the nineteenth century BC about Tishpak's battle with the lion/dragon monster Lammu:

    "The cities are distraught, the lands [are thrown into confusion]. The nations are decreased in number, [all of them in mass upheaval]. To their cry of distress no [one answered], to their outcry, no [one asked], 'Who [created] the dragon?" "Sea [created] the dragon." Enlil in heaven drew [its picture], fifty miles is his length, one mile [his width], six cubits his mouth, twelve cubits the circumference of his ea[rs]....Tishpak burst open the clouds and made a violent storm, the seal of his life before him. He shot at him and [slew] the raging dragon. For three years and three months, day and night, the blood of the raging dragon flowed [over the land]" (CT 13.33-34).

    Revelation of course has a Christian variant of the old Chaoskampf myth in ch. 12 (indeed, the chaos monster Lotan [= Hebrew Leviathan] in early Canaanite myths was seven-headed, cf. KTU 1.5 I 1-3, 28-30, and cf. the plural "heads" of Leviathan in Psalm 74:14). In the Lotan myth, the heavens wither and droop when Lotan is vanquished by Baal (KTU 1.5 I 1-4 has very close parallels in Psalm 102:25-27 and Isaiah 27:1, 34:4).

    cameo-d posted Sat, 18 Oct 2008 03:17:00 GMT(10/18/2008)

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    Joined 7/30/2008

    Wouldn't the red moon associated with "bad omen" be a form of astromancy? And if so, wouldn't that be a divination which is supposed to be prohibited (according to scripture)? Wouldn't this be a conflict of principle to look to these "signs" as something prophectic of an event to occur?

    Since "jehovah" seems to have had quite a few "dark and terrible days" and has destroyed many civilizations over a long history.... could it be that "ominous signs" are another part of mind control....a trigger to cause fear?

    cameo-d posted Sat, 18 Oct 2008 03:39:00 GMT(10/18/2008)

    Post 602 of 6842
    Joined 7/30/2008

    Is this the WT stand on prophecy?

    What does WT say about the red moon?

    Reviewing this passage we see that one who uses divination is one who receives information from the fallen angels by means of omens or oracles. The manner is immaterial.... A witch is a medium or mouthpiece of the fallen angels...

    The Golden Age, April 13, 1932 p. 431.

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