Are Popovers and Yorkshire Pudding One and the Same?

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    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 13:55:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    funnyface posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:22:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Thanks Snowbird.for the winkles But you didnt send the PIN!!!!

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:31:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Cockles, winkles, and spotted dick.

    What is the PIN???

    Syl

    funnyface posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:38:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    To get the winkle out You must have one

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:56:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    OOOOOhhhhhh!

    LOL.

    LOL.

    Syl

    RosePetal posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:10:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    I have often watched American shows and people are eating a meal they pass round a plate of what they call biscuits, they eat them with the meal and look like scones. Can anyone tell me what they are, and what they are made of, are they like yorshire puddings or very different ?

    RosePetal

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:20:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Biscuits are made from self-rising or plain flour, shortening, buttermilk.

    If the flour is plain, you have to add leavening ingredient such as baking powder.

    They are a Southern staple, often eaten with fried chicken.

    If you have a weight or blood pressure problem, avoid them like the plague!

    Syl

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:27:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Yorkshire pudding.

    They look quite tasty.

    Syl

    F coffee_black posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:30:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Snowbird...they look similar to popovers... but popovers don't sink in in the middle... they puff up and are hollow in the center..

    Coffee

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:34:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Thanks, Coffee.

    I'll bet they go good with coffee, especially Jamaican Blue Mountain.

    Syl

    CuriousButterfly posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:40:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    This is a photo of Judi's Restaurant's popovers. The brownish stuff is her apple butter.

    CuriousButterfly posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:41:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    I am so dying for one.....

    F snowbird posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 18:42:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    St George of England posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 20:27:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    Nobody mentioned pancakes.

    These are essentially Yorkshire Pudding mixture fried in a little oil in a frying pan, tossed over half way through cooking. They are traditionally served sprinkled with sugar and either orange or lemon squeezed on them. Always served on Shrove Tuesday (unless you are a JW of course!)

    George

    F coffee_black posted Wed, 06 Oct 2010 22:15:00 GMT(10/6/2010)

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    St George,

    In New England we serve pancakes with maple syrup...or fresh berries and whipped cream...

    Coffee

    Heaven posted Thu, 07 Oct 2010 00:34:00 GMT(10/7/2010)

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    Popovers and Yorkshire Pudding are very similar but cooked in different pans in a slightly different way.

    With Yorkshire Pudding, you put the fat from the roast into the bottom of a square pan and pour the mixed ingredients in and then bake.

    With Popovers, you put oil in with the ingredients, blend, then pour into a muffin pan and bake.

    At least, that's how we used to make them. They both are delish!

    GentlyFeral posted Thu, 07 Oct 2010 02:01:00 GMT(10/7/2010)

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    lozhazleft:

    In Yorkshire they make large plate sized ones and then they put the Roast Beef, Vegetable and Gravy inside the pudding...very nice...I cant imagine having them with sweet things lol Loz x

    If you make them with beef dripping in the traditional British way, no, you wouldn't like them with jam, probably. The only difference between popovers and Yorkshire pudding is the substitution of butter for beef dripping. And we all know how nicely butter and breadstuffs go with jam :)

    gently feral

    GentlyFeral posted Thu, 07 Oct 2010 02:14:00 GMT(10/7/2010)

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    RosePetal,

    I have often watched American shows and people are eating a meal they pass round a plate of what they call biscuits, they eat them with the meal and look like scones. Can anyone tell me what they are, and what they are made of, are they like yorshire puddings or very different ?

    They are much more like scones than like Yorkshire puddings. They're leavened with baking powder, but are typically made with no sugar; they don't depend on the "surprise" effect of hot fat to rise. Also, you'll never see raisins in a baking powder biscuit (you can get scones in the US that often have all kinds of dried fruit in them. Lovely, but I don't know how British they are.) Just google a recipe for "baking powder biscuits" and you'll see what it's all about.

    Also, in the US we have "strawberry shortcake," which starts with a large scone an oversized baking powder biscuit that is made with sugar. You split it open horizontally and pile it with sliced strawberries, sugar, and whipped cream. Then the top goes back on, and you can pile on more strawberries and cream if you like.

    Oh, and snowbird explains:

    Biscuits are made from self-rising or plain flour, shortening, buttermilk.

    I defer to her expertise, but you can make tasty ones with sweet ("regular") milk.

    St George of England, I must correct your statement:

    These are essentially Yorkshire Pudding mixture fried in a little oil in a frying pan, tossed over half way through cooking.

    That's a crépe. Or possibly a Swedish pancake. In the US, pancakes have baking powder in them. They're thicker than crépes and absorb butter and syrup delightfully.

    gently feral

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