Jehovah's Witness Radio/TV Station?

Advertisement

Viewed 8478 times

    ilikecheese posted Mon, 09 Apr 2012 11:03:00 GMT(4/9/2012)

    Post 45 of 215
    Joined 11/7/2011

    In terms of Christian ministries, radio and TV stations/shows are such an effective tool. I've worked in Christian media, and I can see the impact that it has on people. If you have a pastor who knows their stuff, is crazy passionate about it, and is a little less loony and more empathetic, they can really get a lot of people interested. The amount of people who have converted because of well knowns like Greg Laurie, Billy Graham, etc. is pretty good. There are even Christian musicians who have done a really good job of using their enthusiasm and love for God to get people interested in Christianity.

    Have the JWs ever tried any witnessing like that? It would be far better than annoying people at their doors. I can see why they wouldn't use music as a tool, seeing as it's far too "worldly." But if they had a JW version of Carman in the 90s, who knows?! I still love that guy. (Don't judge me; I think he's fun!) They should at least try the media outlet, though. That way people can look into it without being bothered by someone. They could still put their spin on it, but make it more relatable to the public? I don't know. I just don't understand why they don't try to do more of that. It's a far better method than sending their members out to be reviled by people. And subjecting unsuspecting homeowners to magazines best suited for the logical capacity of a five year old. Although I suppose their programming might end up being best suited for the logic of a kindergartner, too.

    Do they have a history of trying this? What do you think it would be like if they tried it today? Would it just terrify the public? =p

    thomyorke posted Mon, 09 Apr 2012 11:35:00 GMT(4/9/2012)

    Post 6 of 30
    Joined 4/4/2012

    In the past they had their own WBBR radiostation...

    F blondie posted Mon, 09 Apr 2012 11:35:00 GMT(4/9/2012)

    Post 33583 of 37614
    Joined 5/28/2001

    The WTS had at least 2 radio stations up until the 1950's but only appeared on TV from time to time and had movies shown around convention times.

    *** jv chap. 7 p. 80 Advertise the King and the Kingdom! (1919-1941) ***WBBR, in New York, was operated by the Watch Tower Society from 1924 until 1957

    *** jv chap. 25 p. 572 Preaching Publicly and From House to House ***Although radio and television broadcasts have been used to spread the Kingdom message, Jehovah’s Witnesses recognize that the personal contact made possible by house-to-house calls is far more effective. It affords better opportunity to answer the questions of individual householders and to search out deserving ones. (Matt. 10:11) That is one of the reasons why, in 1957, the Watch Tower Society sold radio station WBBR in New York.

    *** w87 5/1 p. 28 Looking Back Over 93 Years of Living ***Radio and Convention Privileges

    I continued serving at the Colporteur Desk until 1926. In the meantime, the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society had established on Staten Island its first radio station, WBBR. That was in 1924. I had the joyous privilege of serving on the Society’s programs, not only delivering speeches but also rendering tenor solos, and even playing the mandolin to piano accompaniment. Further, I sang second tenor in our WBBR male quartet. Of course, Brother Rutherford, as the president of the Society, was the featured speaker over WBBR and had a vast listening audience.

    *** g84 12/8 pp. 6-7 Modern Inventions Used to Publish the Good News ***Marconi’s InventionTransmits Good News

    Guglielmo Marconi received the first wireless signal from across the Atlantic in 1901. But it was not until 1920 that KDKA, the world’s first radio station to operate on a daily schedule, began to broadcast from East Pittsburgh. So what a surprise for many in the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware when in April 1922 they heard the voice of J. F. Rutherford, then president of the Watch Tower Society, presenting a lecture with the theme “Millions Now Living Will Never Die.” The novelty of it all can be seen from the headline in the Philadelphia Record: “Judge Rutherford’s Lecture Broadcasted from Metropolitan Opera House. Talks into Transmitter. Message is Carried Over Miles of Bell Telephone Wires to Howlett’s [Radio] Station.”

    The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society was quick to see the possibilities for rapid transmission of the Kingdom message by radio, which was growing in popularity. Thus in 1922 the Society purchased land on Staten Island, New York City, to build its own radio station. A government license was obtained and the Society’s station was assigned the call letters WBBR. The first broadcast was made on Sunday, February 24, 1924.

    This was just the beginning of the Watch Tower Society’s use of radio. By 1925 another radio station, call sign WORD, was broadcasting Bible truth from Batavia, Illinois. Eventually worldwide networks of radio stations were set up to broadcast recorded Bible programs and discourses. By 1933, the peak year, 408 stations were being used to carry the message to six continents!

    In 1957, after 33 years of broadcasting, the Society sold WBBR. Why the change of policy? Because there were now many congregations of Jehovah’s Witnesses in the area covered by the station, and they were able to give a more effective person-to-person witness by calling at the homes of the people. (Acts 20:20) Furthermore, the station and programs tied up manpower and money that could be better used in other ways, especially in the missionary field. For similar reasons television has been used sparingly.

    scotoma posted Mon, 09 Apr 2012 15:03:00 GMT(4/9/2012)

    Post 148 of 841
    Joined 4/17/2011

    JW's could easily own a satelite like 700 club. If JW's worked a little overtime on their jobs instead of field service on Saturdays and gave it to the Watchtower they could own a couple sattelites broadcasting 24/7.

    People could be reached at the critical point where they are most vulnerable to a "religious" solution.

    It's probably better that they haven't done that.

    M james_woods posted Mon, 09 Apr 2012 15:33:00 GMT(4/9/2012)

    Post 8661 of 12292
    Joined 10/26/2005

    The idea has been expressed here several times that at the height of their Radio Broadcast Network (Rutherford era) - they began to fear that the FCC would regulate the broadcast content. They were extremely outspoken against other religions - practically to the point of what we would today call hate speech.

    My personal feeling also is that N.H. Knorr realized that door-to-door book selling would make a better business model than a network of radio stations. The preaching work was (for him) to sell literature.

    It did not really matter if radio or TV could have made more converts.

    Also, if you have ever seen one of those JW TV spots - they were embarrassingly naive; even for their day.

    ilikecheese posted Tue, 10 Apr 2012 10:52:00 GMT(4/10/2012)

    Post 50 of 215
    Joined 11/7/2011

    Thanks for all that info, blondie! You're always so on top of stuff. I don't post much, but I love reading what you contribute.

    James, I should see if I can find one of those TV spots haha.

    I suppose it is good that they can't reach more people via media, but for their sakes, it makes absolutely no sense not to. Unless, of course, like you mentioned, they're afraid their stuff could be labeled hate speech. Even their public Watchtowers are basically hate speech, so I can't imagine they'd tone it down on TV or radio. I can imagine them acting out their "Are All Christians Christian?" article. The logic in that could be disproved by a semi-intellectual eight year old, but it was still mighty rude!

    St George of England posted Sat, 07 Jul 2012 16:09:00 GMT(7/7/2012)

    Post 1597 of 2557
    Joined 3/22/2010
    By 1925 another radio station, call sign WORD, was broadcasting Bible truth from Batavia, Illinois. Eventually worldwide networks of radio stations were set up to broadcast recorded Bible programs and discourses.

    I had never heard of this station before, I had only heard of WBBR. However I just spotted a stamp on e-bay purporting to come from this era of broadcasting:

    Watchtower IBSA jehovah Witness bible students WORD Stamp

    George

    wasblind posted Sat, 07 Jul 2012 16:34:00 GMT(7/7/2012)

    Post 6214 of 9409
    Joined 6/13/2010

    *** jv chap. 25 p. 572 Preaching Publicly and From House to House ***Although radio and television broadcasts have been used to spread the Kingdom message, Jehovah’s Witnesses recognize that the personal contact made possible by house-to-house calls is far more effective. It affords better opportunity to answer the questions of individual householders and to search out deserving ones. (Matt. 10:11) That is one of the reasons why, in 1957, the Watch Tower Society sold radio station WBBR in New York.

    Hello Blondie

    I thought about the earthquake that happened in Japan, readin' this

    and the WTS thinks this is the best way to get out an urgent message ???

    " The message that the witnesses proclaim involves the lives of people ; they want to be careful not to miss no one."_____Reasoning book page 206

    " Time remaining is very short "___Reasoning book page 239

    .

    M kurtbethel posted Tue, 10 Jul 2012 20:57:00 GMT(7/10/2012)

    Post 3336 of 4630
    Joined 5/20/2007

    When a JW claims they are doing the work of getting an urgent message out, I like doing this little demonstration. Get a TV, or a radio, especially one of the shortwave variety. Then tune across the dial. You will find the Catholics, Adventist World Radio, even Harold Camping's Family Radio. These and many others a truly preaching to all nations in every corner of the world. You will not hear even a peep from the Watchtower. Their absence on broadcasts gives lie to their claim of getting an urgent message out to the nations because time is short.

    They obviously have some other agenda, likely tied to their business model.

    They also are likely aware that their message is only effective to those who they have bedazzled and indoctrinated into accepting it. They know how their dramas and Sparlock stuff would sound to outsiders and that they must keep it secret. They certainly produce enough content to support a radio station or a live stream. But their business model demands it be kept in house, and only a sugared up version is available to the public.

      Close

      Confirm ...