Satanic Ritual Abuse (SRA) in the Watchtower

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    M Dogpatch posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 17:26:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 2473 of 3989
    Joined 12/26/2000

    crappy demons

    Satanic Ritual Abuse (SRA) and the Watchtower

    SORRY! Crappy demons messed this up. http://www.freeminds.org/history/onSatanism.htm

    Randy

    M stillajwexelder posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 17:42:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 15639 of 16005
    Joined 2/24/2003

    Great advice Randy. Thanks

    M Dogpatch posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 18:02:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 2474 of 3989
    Joined 12/26/2000

    most of the occult has a lot of draw precisely because it is forbidden to many religions.

    Strip the emotions and excitment away, and it is SO 20th century. :-))

    alt

    Shell games by cheesy power-seekers.

    Randy

    The shell game (also known as Thimblerig, Three shells and a pea, the old army game) is portrayed as a gambling game, but in reality, when a wager for money is made, it is a confidence trick used to perpetrate fraud. In confidence trick slang, this famous swindle is referred to as a short-con because it is quick and easy to pull off.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_game

    alt

    M Dogpatch posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 18:04:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 2475 of 3989
    Joined 12/26/2000

    Confidence Tricks

    (used by all manner of religious hucksters as well)

    History

    The first known usage of the term "confidence man" was in 1849; it was used by the press during the trial of William Thompson. Thompson chatted with strangers until he asked if they had the confidence to lend him their watches, whereupon he would walk off with the watch; he was captured when a victim recognized him on the street. [ 1 ]

    [edit] Vulnerability to confidence tricks

    Persons of any level of intelligence are vulnerable to deception by experienced con artists. Confidence tricks exploit human weaknesses like greed, dishonesty, vanity, but also virtues like honesty, compassion, or a naïve expectation of good faith on the part of the con artist.

    Just as there is no typical profile for swindlers, neither is there one for their victims. Virtually anyone can fall prey to fraudulent crimes. … Certainly victims of high-yield investment frauds may possess a level of greed which exceeds their caution as well as a willingness to believe what they want to believe. However, not all fraud victims are greedy, risk-taking, self-deceptive individuals looking to make a quick dollar. Nor are all fraud victims naive, uneducated, or elderly. [ 2 ]

    Confidence tricksters often rely on the greed and dishonesty of the mark, who may attempt to out-cheat the con artist, only to discover that he or she has been manipulated into losing from the very beginning. This is such a general principle in confidence tricks that there is a saying among con men that "you can't cheat an honest man." [ 3 ]

    Nevertheless, some tricks depend on the honesty of the victim. In a common scam, as part of an apparently legitimate transaction, the victim is sent a worthless check, which the victim then deposits. The victim is then urged to forward the apparent value of the check to the trickster as cash, possibly keeping a small portion of the money as a commission, which they may do before discovering the check bounces. Another fashionable scenario (as of 2006) [citation needed] has the victim recruited as a "financial agent" to collect "business debts." Paper checks are not always involved: funds may be transferred electronically from another victim.

    Sometimes con men rely on naive individuals who put their confidence into get-rich-quick schemes, such as "too good to be true" investments. It may take years for the wider community to discover that such investment schemes are bogus. By the time they are discovered, many people may have lost their life savings to something in which they have been persuaded to invest.

    The confidence trickster often works with one or more accomplices called shills, who help manipulate the mark into accepting the con man's plan. In a traditional confidence trick, the mark is led to believe that he will be able to win money or some other prize by doing some task. The accomplices may pretend to be random strangers who have benefited from successfully performing the task.

    M inkling posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 18:50:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 916 of 1399
    Joined 10/14/2007
    which is the same reason I don’t believe Pat Garza’s tale of Governing Body member Ted Jaracz being a child molester. Lack of evidence from an uncritical source.

    I myself delved into this mire a while ago... Wasn't the only sorce Ravyn Gulliani? Didn't she have somthing to do with the SRA claims too?

    M Dogpatch posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 19:40:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 2476 of 3989
    Joined 12/26/2000

    email response:

    You say you don't believe people who say the Watchtower Society headquarters has people who rape children and are Satanists because they are "uncritical sources." You rephrased what I said. Why, To make it look like I wouldn't believe ANY such stories? I have believed others that I DID have evidence of. The following is in response to a private email as to why I discounted the supposed tale of “Satan worshippers in the tunnels of Bethel”, as well as other hearsay accounts of Satanic Ritual Abuse (SRA) in the Watchtower organization… which is the same reason I don’t believe Pat Garza’s tale of Governing Body member Ted Jaracz being a child molester. Lack of evidence from an uncritical source. No, I don't believe any serious accusations against another person without a reasonable amount of evidence. Neither does a court of law. I am sure there have been Satanists who rape children in the Watchtower. The odds make that likely considering the number of felons in and out of the Watchtower. It COULD have even happened at Bethel! But I haven't seen evidence of a believable story yet. Any claims thus far would surely be discounted in a court of law for lack of evidence, and you know it. ... but not in a "kangaroo" court. Hey, I hear your next door neighbor is a pedophile! I have incredible story for you... How can a victim of rape be anything but critical? How can a victim of SRA be anything but critical? If you were to review a few legal cases with this sort of accusation, you would find a lot of conflicting testimony (see McMartin pre-school trials link), just as Barb Anderson pointed out in the other thread on this, and also check out the story of Mike Warnke, listed in my article. People have all sorts of reasons why they promote things. Mike's was notoriety. He was SO CONVINCING!!! Imagine, perhaps MILLIONS believed him. I would have responded to you on jehovahs-witness.com, but that site no longer allow people to sign in unless they are already signed in. Except for that you would have a lot of responses pointing this out. Pedophilia is a big problem in the Watchtower, and the leaders are responsible. To imply they are "demonic" in a Christian context, based on some cockamamie story, makes you as dishonest and conniving as they are. I have noticed that the ones who promote this nonsense often seem to be/have heavily been involved in the occult themselves,apart from their "victimization." THAT should give you a motivational clue, if you ask me. :-)) Randy

    M Uzzah posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 23:26:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 1371 of 1490
    Joined 1/22/2003

    I have heard and read many claims of SRA primarily focusing on areas of the west coast of the United States.

    Having been at Bethel for 11 years I can swear that I saw absolutely no evidence of ritual abuse, satanic or otherwise, except for the emotional/psychological abuse common throughout the Cult of Jehovah's Witnesses.

    I believe there has been some isolated examples of perverted and sick actions by people who happened to be within the Jehovah's WItness congregations but it was not sanctioned nor part of the Organization's practices.

    Some victims of this sort of abuse are damaged emotionally and can often attempt to put disjointed memories or thoughts together so they can make some sense. I don't think the Pat Garza's are intentionally lying but I do believe their perceptions, memories and sense of balance are not completely straight.

    M Homerovah the Almighty posted Fri, 28 Nov 2008 23:28:00 GMT(11/28/2008)

    Post 2841 of 4027
    Joined 8/30/2007

    This is just imaginary vindictive sensationalism and nothing else,

    Hitting the Watchtower Society over the head with a wet noodle isn't going to do anything accept make your self look foolish in doing so.

    M Tired of the Hypocrisy posted Sat, 29 Nov 2008 07:01:00 GMT(11/29/2008)

    Post 1569 of 1934
    Joined 1/29/2008

    To believe it or not. I cannot say that I would not like to believe there is another chink in the wt's armor we could exploit and loosen the cult's grip on these people. However, just because someone says it does not make it effing so. Credibility means the world to me. I am sure some sort of ritual abuse goes on within the wt, but unless I see hard evidence from an unbiased source I will have my doubts about the current accusations. Not to be an ass, I just want to treat everyone like I wish to be treated. Fair and impartial.

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